Tag Archives

Envoy: Shark Cull

Society is taught to be terrified of sharks, but the more we learn of these ‘mankillers’ the more the fear subsides. There is a misconception – are sharks actually the victims? Marine biologists agree that sharks are not out hunting for humans and on the rare occasion when there is an attack it’s owing to […]

Edge Of The World

Edge Of The World tells the very interesting story of Indian-born, British soldier, Sir James Brooke who became Governor then Rajah of Sarawak, the largest state of Borneo, in 1841. The film is engaging from start to finish and is punctuated by a series of unexpected events that helps to capture audience attention. Cringe-worthy at […]

French Retro Film Festival

Lovers of French Cinema should be delighted with the specially curated Vive La Revolution: French Retro Film Festival which arrives just in time for the Bastille Day celebrations. The program consists of 12 classic comedies and dramas that have made an impact on discerning audiences over the years and should also be of interest to […]

EMA

When someone says the words ‘art film,’ something like EMA should come to mind: A colourful, arresting visual aesthetic, freewheeling sequences in which dance substitutes dialogue, and a constant sense of unabated sensuality. The film is a psychodrama about the eponymous character, a contemporary dancer, reckoning with both her divorce from the director of her […]

Finding You

Audiences should not be surprised if, shortly after the film has commenced, they get a nagging feeling that they’ve seen all this before. It’s the story of Finley Sinclair (Rose Reid), a young American student who, after failing her violin audition to gain entrance into music school, flies off to Ireland and predictably meets Beckett […]

The Father

Brilliant is the only word to describe this incredible piece of filmmaking which deals with the debilitating illness dementia. Nominated for six Academy awards it’s a film that may be too close to home for many moviegoers. Anthony Hopkins gives a predictably outstanding  performance as an elderly man who feels that his daughter is scheming […]

French Exit

A confused tone and inconsistent pacing leave Azazel Jacobs’ absurdist comedy, at times, a little too absurd for its own good. French Exit follows the trans-continental exploits of widowed New York socialite Francis Price (Michelle Pfeiffer) and her adult son Malcolm (Lucas Hedges) on their not-so-temporary sojourn to Paris after Francis is walled off from […]

Oliver Sack: His Own Life

When Oliver Sacks was asked whether he was primarily a doctor or writer his response was, “equally first!” This insightful documentary details his life from early beginnings. Born in England in 1933 to Jewish parents who were medical professionals, he was separated from his parents during WWII, later found love in chemistry, and moved to […]

A Lion Returns

This low budget controversial new Australian film, written and directed by Serhat Caradee, deserves many accolades and should be classified as mandatory viewing. Jamal is a Muslim who returns to Australia to visit his terminally ill mother. He’s regarded as a terrorist in Australia, disowned by his father for bringing much shame and misery to […]

The Climb

A long and somewhat toxic friendship between two men is put under the microscope in this bizarre low budget indie comedy which leaves audiences asking, can precious friendships survive regardless of what moralistic borderlines have been crossed? Mike (Michael Angelo Covino) and Kyle (Kyle Marvin) can best be described as the quintessential ‘odd couple’ and […]